CONTACT

646-956-6063

FOLLOW

©2017 BY WHERE ARTISTS RISE. PROUDLY CREATED WITH WIX.COM

ViolettLight180x100.jpg
PatriziaCasagranda.jpg
PC1.jpg
IMG_7282.jpg
IMG_8725_detail.jpg
IMG_6239sw.jpg
BeautifukBrown__100x80cm.jpg

Every time I see a modern day artist take a classical style and twist it to create their own is always an inspiration to me. This time was no different as I was scrolling through the artists that friend request the Where Artists Rise Instagram page and I came across German artist Patrizia Casagranda.


Patrizia took the Leonardo Da Vinci, Filipino Lippi,Michelangelo Buonarroti,Raffaello Santi  and Corregio  Fresco painting style and blended it with Roy Lichenstein and what she came up with are these beautiful abstract yet realistic portraits depending on your distance to them. It is quite wonderful. Ladies and gentlemen I introduce you to Patrizia Casagranda.


 Name: Patrizia Casagranda

Hometown: Krefeld, Germany ( I am a German with Italian roots)


When did you decide to become an artist? Was there a pivotal moment in your life that made you choose the path that you did?



 I have been painting since my childhood. I studied painting by an artist in Stuttgart at the age 14 till 16. And I worked first as a designer. It was always my passion to design something. I made book designs for Günther Uecker and Markus Lüpertz. I was fascinated by the power of Günther Uecker and how he worked with his 80 years in his atelier full of passion and attention. And I said to me I will try the same. Back to the roots.




What is your chosen medium and why? It is always mixed media. I love structures, and this is how I can express them.



I paint always in series. There are 30 pieces or even more from one series. You can see it on www.patriziacasagranda.com  it was a development.  First in the first series and the second series I used Photos and stencils, graffiti, Collages like a kind of street art. In the third series I tried to paint the faces of the woman and I studied the old paintings of Italy from Pompeii and I was fascinated about the colors and the structures of these old Frescos from Italy and also about the dream symbols. It is an eternal language till nowadays. I love the materiality of the paintings. It is like an old wall.



Now I work with mixed media. It is gypsum, pointillism, stencils, Typography-Fragments in the background (the speech of Charlie Chaplin The great dictator we are to machines, the power to create happiness etc.) and I try to ease the faces of the Indian girls. It is only important how they look like. It is standing for their vitality strength, beauty and power. This is my Text of the fourth series.


I regularly work in the poor regions of North India. I have the privilege of getting to know some very remarkable and special women there. Every morning we shared a cup of tea and many words. The tribal women were proud beautiful women who with great skills collected goods that was discarded as garbage. Junk and garbage to some – but the survival of the collectors and their families. A tiny gap, only, between life, survival and disaster. All life concentrated on the “Here and Now” situation.


I was taken in by these women’s skills to go on trusting “the Tomorrow” with an astonishing joy of being. The portraits of the women have titles such as, “Kiran, the Light”, “Sunder, the Beautiful” or “Laxmi, the Rich”. The titles could be interpreted as dreams –to me they represent the tribal women’s attitudes to life. The women focus on the present, the positive aspects of life and solidarity.


What is the name of your most proud piece? And explain to us why it is your prize possession amongst the rest?.

 Violett Light (Kiran) it was my first portrait of painting with the new form of abstraction. When you see the painting only from 50 cm distance so it seemed to be abstract and from distance you recognize the face of Kiran. This kind of abstraction, materiality and colors blows my mind. I love it.


What are your accomplishments?

 I want to express feelings in colors and materiality. And I love stories. Stories of life.

2002 graduate designer with award at FH Niederrhein

since 2002 art director in Krefeld/Düsseldorf/Venlo

since 2000 working for International Art Center Netherlands

1994 beeing Thomas Dürr’s student (artist in Stuttgart) for 2 years

Academy of Arts in Ravensburg and Trier

Book design and collaboration with Günther Uecker and Markus Lüpertz

I’m working in Germany, Netherlands and India.

        Awards:

        •2008 at the international design exposition

     •2005 Art Directors Club award for book design Emile van der Kruk

     •1997 F.G. Winterpreis

  • Prizes

  • Nomination for the Art Prize NRW, Germany

  • Art Prize artboxgallery Zurich, Swizzerland

  • Publications

  • Nijimagazine We showcase the best emerging talent Internet platform London 2017

  • Decideart We support emerging artists Internet platform London 2017

  • 1340Art | International art Magazine 2017 Printed version (january 2018) and Instagram 

  • Drailed contemporary art magazine United States/Australia 2017 (february 2018)

  • Rheinische Post 2017

  • Zeitkunst 2017



Where do you see yourself in five years?

I have so much fun what I am doing and I go for it for the next five years :-)



What is your biggest inspiration and aspiration?

The Indian girls inspired me. How is it possible that they are so happy with then have little to nothing. I ask myself what makes people happy? Is it falling in love? Having fun and doing something with passion? A social life? Dancing?


In one complete sentence tell me who you are as an artist?

I am an observer. I have fun what I am doing.


Well there you have it you ladies and gents! You got to meet a new artist from a different country who is inspired not only by the classical style but also by the human world. She wants to empower women and overall people to be more humble and understand to be more humane and give back in some shape or form. Included in this piece below. You can read the description of Patrizia’s series by a renowned art historian as well as read a description of how she begins her pieces. Please remember to follow Patrizia on her website and social media pages www.instagram.com/casagrandapatrizia


“The works of Patrizia Casagranda are an alluring invitation to dream, the opportunity to take your thoughts on a fascinating inner voyage. Looking upon these charming women‘s portraits, you are led to believe that they have originated from an alternate bygone era and world, although they clearly depict the faces of modern young women. Casagranda creates expressive connections through the coalescence of collage, painting and graffiti - the complexity she thus achieves in her paintings is fascinating. At first sight, these works appear very illustrative and aesthetic. However, the deceptive use of materials unveils a continuous array of new levels and perspectives; the fragility of the seemingly crumbling layers of paint, the lace and fibres that have been incorporated, as well as the relief-like impasto brushstrokes merge into a symbiosis of ancient murals from a long past epoch with that of contemporary, modern art. Through the apparent weathering of her works as well as random corrosion processes, damaged metal, torn and yellowed paper and structures, which are reminiscent of crumbling plaster, and decay, Patrizia Casagranda portrays a transitory world; however, it is one that also encompasses a piece of eternity. This transience - which is evident in both the material and the depiction of youthful beauty - is, on the one hand, part of Vanitas“ symbolism, which is repeatedly used in art, but, on the other hand, proves to be a reflection upon the fast-paced media landscape and its rapidly changing advertising strategies and ideals for beauty. Through their almost tangible materiality, Patrizia Casagranta‘s works offer a remarkable level of fascination – which is quite rare in a world where we see an ever growing abundance of digital art. Layer for layer, they reveal their soul to the observer and what lies beneath. You can read these paintings; you can wander through them and even lose yourself in them. They tell stories from The Thousand and One Nights, quote from fairy-tale worlds and mythological legends and play with the contrast between transience and modernity. What is most important in this work is the use of strong symbolism, whose very meanings the artist does not deny us. It becomes obvious that there is a strong interaction between the women who are portrayed and the surrounding symbolic world -it is clear that their thoughts revolve around the deciphering of these symbols and their perplexed facial expressions question their very meaning. The symbolism is derived from the worlds of fairy tales, myths and legend and is subtly integrated into the visual language. We see mirrors becoming signs of self-knowledge, horses are a metaphor for irrepressible life energy, cherries stand for love and affection, does represent grace and speed, and peacocks stand for rulership and beauty - these and many other symbols have great significance for the artist. They serve the fragmentary narrative of the images and can be understood to be a possible mnemonic. Ultimately, Patrizia Casagranda would like to invite the observer to approach her paintings with their own stories and feelings. Of German-Italian extraction, Patrizia Casagranda spends part of the year in India; the influences of this world - which is often mysterious to us - can also be found in the imagery of her work. A further aesthetic design tool she uses is typography, which often appears in her work; As an illustrative element, it fits into the composition of the picture, but only serves as an inkling of a story – it is nothing that can be read or understood, but merely an invitation to the observer to see for himself, to develop his or her own thoughts and ideas. At first sight, however, the images appear to be fragile and transient - but if the observer examines the complexity of the presentation and its themes, it soon becomes clear that the materiality of the works, the sensuality of the young beauty depicted and the strong symbolism in their symbiosis serve as both an energy force and motivation. The centuries-old tales and myths cited by Patrizia Casagranda, which have been passed down from generation to generation, touch our collective memory and create worlds of reminiscences. They allow us to dwell in them, to take a moment out of our everyday lives and to sense our own thoughts and feelings. Patrizia Casagranda wants to provide us with pleasure through her pictures and to initiate a positive experience when observing them - with all the beautiful beings in her fascinating world of fairy tales she achieves this effortlessly. Patrizia Casagranda lives and works in Germany, the Netherlands and India”.


K. Weeke Art Historian

HOW TO DO IT

How to create an image that embraces all conflicts.

I create a background using the garbage objects, the women have found. Then I touch up the background with elements such as graffiti, stencil art, painting and various typographic fragments. All to create the base of the unique portraits showing the women’s enormous vitality.

I use this technique as an original way to link conceptual issues together with  a realistic form of design.

This surprising symbiosis affects me, makes me consider philosophical themes such as beauty, life and the question of global justice.


 
ViolettLight180x100.jpg
PatriziaCasagranda.jpg
PC1.jpg
IMG_7282.jpg
IMG_8725_detail.jpg
IMG_6239sw.jpg
BeautifukBrown__100x80cm.jpg

Every time I see a modern day artist take a classical style and twist it to create their own is always an inspiration to me. This time was no different as I was scrolling through the artists that friend request the Where Artists Rise Instagram page and I came across German artist Patrizia Casagranda.


Patrizia took the Leonardo Da Vinci, Filipino Lippi,Michelangelo Buonarroti,Raffaello Santi  and Corregio  Fresco painting style and blended it with Roy Lichenstein and what she came up with are these beautiful abstract yet realistic portraits depending on your distance to them. It is quite wonderful. Ladies and gentlemen I introduce you to Patrizia Casagranda.


 Name: Patrizia Casagranda

Hometown: Krefeld, Germany ( I am a German with Italian roots)


When did you decide to become an artist? Was there a pivotal moment in your life that made you choose the path that you did?



 I have been painting since my childhood. I studied painting by an artist in Stuttgart at the age 14 till 16. And I worked first as a designer. It was always my passion to design something. I made book designs for Günther Uecker and Markus Lüpertz. I was fascinated by the power of Günther Uecker and how he worked with his 80 years in his atelier full of passion and attention. And I said to me I will try the same. Back to the roots.




What is your chosen medium and why? It is always mixed media. I love structures, and this is how I can express them.



I paint always in series. There are 30 pieces or even more from one series. You can see it on www.patriziacasagranda.com  it was a development.  First in the first series and the second series I used Photos and stencils, graffiti, Collages like a kind of street art. In the third series I tried to paint the faces of the woman and I studied the old paintings of Italy from Pompeii and I was fascinated about the colors and the structures of these old Frescos from Italy and also about the dream symbols. It is an eternal language till nowadays. I love the materiality of the paintings. It is like an old wall.



Now I work with mixed media. It is gypsum, pointillism, stencils, Typography-Fragments in the background (the speech of Charlie Chaplin The great dictator we are to machines, the power to create happiness etc.) and I try to ease the faces of the Indian girls. It is only important how they look like. It is standing for their vitality strength, beauty and power. This is my Text of the fourth series.


I regularly work in the poor regions of North India. I have the privilege of getting to know some very remarkable and special women there. Every morning we shared a cup of tea and many words. The tribal women were proud beautiful women who with great skills collected goods that was discarded as garbage. Junk and garbage to some – but the survival of the collectors and their families. A tiny gap, only, between life, survival and disaster. All life concentrated on the “Here and Now” situation.


I was taken in by these women’s skills to go on trusting “the Tomorrow” with an astonishing joy of being. The portraits of the women have titles such as, “Kiran, the Light”, “Sunder, the Beautiful” or “Laxmi, the Rich”. The titles could be interpreted as dreams –to me they represent the tribal women’s attitudes to life. The women focus on the present, the positive aspects of life and solidarity.


What is the name of your most proud piece? And explain to us why it is your prize possession amongst the rest?.

 Violett Light (Kiran) it was my first portrait of painting with the new form of abstraction. When you see the painting only from 50 cm distance so it seemed to be abstract and from distance you recognize the face of Kiran. This kind of abstraction, materiality and colors blows my mind. I love it.


What are your accomplishments?

 I want to express feelings in colors and materiality. And I love stories. Stories of life.

2002 graduate designer with award at FH Niederrhein

since 2002 art director in Krefeld/Düsseldorf/Venlo

since 2000 working for International Art Center Netherlands

1994 beeing Thomas Dürr’s student (artist in Stuttgart) for 2 years

Academy of Arts in Ravensburg and Trier

Book design and collaboration with Günther Uecker and Markus Lüpertz

I’m working in Germany, Netherlands and India.

        Awards:

        •2008 at the international design exposition

     •2005 Art Directors Club award for book design Emile van der Kruk

     •1997 F.G. Winterpreis

  • Prizes

  • Nomination for the Art Prize NRW, Germany

  • Art Prize artboxgallery Zurich, Swizzerland

  • Publications

  • Nijimagazine We showcase the best emerging talent Internet platform London 2017

  • Decideart We support emerging artists Internet platform London 2017

  • 1340Art | International art Magazine 2017 Printed version (january 2018) and Instagram 

  • Drailed contemporary art magazine United States/Australia 2017 (february 2018)

  • Rheinische Post 2017

  • Zeitkunst 2017



Where do you see yourself in five years?

I have so much fun what I am doing and I go for it for the next five years :-)



What is your biggest inspiration and aspiration?

The Indian girls inspired me. How is it possible that they are so happy with then have little to nothing. I ask myself what makes people happy? Is it falling in love? Having fun and doing something with passion? A social life? Dancing?


In one complete sentence tell me who you are as an artist?

I am an observer. I have fun what I am doing.


Well there you have it you ladies and gents! You got to meet a new artist from a different country who is inspired not only by the classical style but also by the human world. She wants to empower women and overall people to be more humble and understand to be more humane and give back in some shape or form. Included in this piece below. You can read the description of Patrizia’s series by a renowned art historian as well as read a description of how she begins her pieces. Please remember to follow Patrizia on her website and social media pages www.instagram.com/casagrandapatrizia


“The works of Patrizia Casagranda are an alluring invitation to dream, the opportunity to take your thoughts on a fascinating inner voyage. Looking upon these charming women‘s portraits, you are led to believe that they have originated from an alternate bygone era and world, although they clearly depict the faces of modern young women. Casagranda creates expressive connections through the coalescence of collage, painting and graffiti - the complexity she thus achieves in her paintings is fascinating. At first sight, these works appear very illustrative and aesthetic. However, the deceptive use of materials unveils a continuous array of new levels and perspectives; the fragility of the seemingly crumbling layers of paint, the lace and fibres that have been incorporated, as well as the relief-like impasto brushstrokes merge into a symbiosis of ancient murals from a long past epoch with that of contemporary, modern art. Through the apparent weathering of her works as well as random corrosion processes, damaged metal, torn and yellowed paper and structures, which are reminiscent of crumbling plaster, and decay, Patrizia Casagranda portrays a transitory world; however, it is one that also encompasses a piece of eternity. This transience - which is evident in both the material and the depiction of youthful beauty - is, on the one hand, part of Vanitas“ symbolism, which is repeatedly used in art, but, on the other hand, proves to be a reflection upon the fast-paced media landscape and its rapidly changing advertising strategies and ideals for beauty. Through their almost tangible materiality, Patrizia Casagranta‘s works offer a remarkable level of fascination – which is quite rare in a world where we see an ever growing abundance of digital art. Layer for layer, they reveal their soul to the observer and what lies beneath. You can read these paintings; you can wander through them and even lose yourself in them. They tell stories from The Thousand and One Nights, quote from fairy-tale worlds and mythological legends and play with the contrast between transience and modernity. What is most important in this work is the use of strong symbolism, whose very meanings the artist does not deny us. It becomes obvious that there is a strong interaction between the women who are portrayed and the surrounding symbolic world -it is clear that their thoughts revolve around the deciphering of these symbols and their perplexed facial expressions question their very meaning. The symbolism is derived from the worlds of fairy tales, myths and legend and is subtly integrated into the visual language. We see mirrors becoming signs of self-knowledge, horses are a metaphor for irrepressible life energy, cherries stand for love and affection, does represent grace and speed, and peacocks stand for rulership and beauty - these and many other symbols have great significance for the artist. They serve the fragmentary narrative of the images and can be understood to be a possible mnemonic. Ultimately, Patrizia Casagranda would like to invite the observer to approach her paintings with their own stories and feelings. Of German-Italian extraction, Patrizia Casagranda spends part of the year in India; the influences of this world - which is often mysterious to us - can also be found in the imagery of her work. A further aesthetic design tool she uses is typography, which often appears in her work; As an illustrative element, it fits into the composition of the picture, but only serves as an inkling of a story – it is nothing that can be read or understood, but merely an invitation to the observer to see for himself, to develop his or her own thoughts and ideas. At first sight, however, the images appear to be fragile and transient - but if the observer examines the complexity of the presentation and its themes, it soon becomes clear that the materiality of the works, the sensuality of the young beauty depicted and the strong symbolism in their symbiosis serve as both an energy force and motivation. The centuries-old tales and myths cited by Patrizia Casagranda, which have been passed down from generation to generation, touch our collective memory and create worlds of reminiscences. They allow us to dwell in them, to take a moment out of our everyday lives and to sense our own thoughts and feelings. Patrizia Casagranda wants to provide us with pleasure through her pictures and to initiate a positive experience when observing them - with all the beautiful beings in her fascinating world of fairy tales she achieves this effortlessly. Patrizia Casagranda lives and works in Germany, the Netherlands and India”.


K. Weeke Art Historian

HOW TO DO IT

How to create an image that embraces all conflicts.

I create a background using the garbage objects, the women have found. Then I touch up the background with elements such as graffiti, stencil art, painting and various typographic fragments. All to create the base of the unique portraits showing the women’s enormous vitality.

I use this technique as an original way to link conceptual issues together with  a realistic form of design.

This surprising symbiosis affects me, makes me consider philosophical themes such as beauty, life and the question of global justice.